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Download a Section 21 Notice of Possession

Our solicitor prepared Section 21 Notice is used to end a residential Assured Shorthold Tenancy.  This is a mandatory document for any landlord wishing to regain possession.  

How to evict a tenant using section 21 and section 8 notices?

If you're a landlord in England, eviction is a process you may need to go through at some point. Here are 10 things you need to know about evicting a tenant in England:

1. You can only eviction for certain reasons - these are known as 'grounds for eviction'.

2. The most common ground for eviction is that the tenant has not paid rent.

3. Other grounds for eviction include damage to property, anti-social behaviour or breach of contract.

4. If you want to evict your tenant, you'll need to give them notice in writing.

5. The amount of notice you'll need to give depends on the grounds for eviction and whether the tenancy is fixed-term or periodic.

6. If the eviction is for non-payment of rent, you must give your tenant at least 14 days' notice in writing.

7. For other grounds, the notice period depends on the ground itself - for example, if the eviction is for damage to property, you'll need to give at least 4 weeks' notice.

8. Once you've given notice, if the tenant doesn't leave by the end of the notice period, you can apply to the court for a possession order.

9. The court will then decide whether or not to grant the order, and if they do, they'll set a date for eviction.

10. On eviction day, bailiffs will visit the property to remove the tenant and their belongings.

If you find yourself in the situation where you need to evict a tenant, make sure you're familiar with the process and the grounds for eviction. eviction can be a stressful experience for both landlords and tenants, so it's important to know your rights and responsibilities.


Section 8 Notices

If you're a landlord in England, eviction isn't something you can do on a whim. You must have grounds for eviction and follow the proper process, which includes serving your tenant with a section 8 notice.

The section 8 notice is also sometimes called a "notice to quit" or a "notice seeking possession." It's a formal notice that tells your tenant that you're planning to begin eviction proceedings against them.

There are several grounds for eviction that are listed in the Housing Act 1988. To evict your tenant using a section 8 notice, you must have one of these grounds:

- The tenant has not paid rent: If your tenant owes you rent, you can serve them with a section 8 notice. You must give them 14 days to pay the rent they owe. If they don't pay, you can begin eviction proceedings.

- The tenant has breached their tenancy agreement: If your tenant has breached the terms of their tenancy agreement, you can serve them with a section 8 notice. Some examples of breaches include having unauthorized pets, causing damage to the property, or having too many people living in the unit.

- The tenant is a nuisance: If your tenant is behaving in a way that is disruptive or causing problems for other tenants, you can serve them with a section 8 notice. Examples of nuisances include making excessive noise, being violent, or dealing drugs on the property.

- The property is uninhabitable: If the property is no longer fit for human habitation, you can serve your tenant with a section 8 notice. This might be the case if there is severe damage to the property or if there are health and safety hazards.

- The tenant has abandoned the property: If your tenant has left the property without giving notice and has no intention of returning, you can serve them with a section 8 notice. You must wait 14 days after they have left before you can begin eviction proceedings.

Once you've served your tenant with a section 8 notice, they have 14 days to either remedy the situation or move out. If they don't do either of those things, you can then file for eviction with your local court.

Section 21 Notices

If you're a landlord in England, you may be wondering how to evict a tenant using a section 21 notice. The section 21 notice process is a no-fault eviction procedure that can be used to end a tenancy.

The first step is to served the tenant with a section 21 notice. This notice must be in writing and must give the tenant at least two months' notice to vacate the property.

Once the notice has been served, the landlord can apply to the court for an eviction order. If the order is granted, the tenant will have to vacate the property within 14 days.

The eviction process can be complicated and it's important to follow all of the steps correctly in order to avoid any legal problems. If you're not sure how to proceed, it's best to seek legal advice.


Download a Section 21 Notice of Possession

Our solicitor prepared Section 21 Notice is used to end a residential Assured Shorthold Tenancy.  This is a mandatory document for any landlord wishing to regain possession.